Cranes, Wildlife and History on the Great Platte River Road

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Cranes have been represented in art throughout history. “Sōshū umezawa zai” (Umezawa manor in Sōshū), Hokusai Katsushika, artist, woodcut, 1832 or 1833, LC-DIG-jpd-00414 (digital file from original print). (Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress)

By Gene Hunt

Coming soon will be one of the great natural wonders in the world. Please come to enjoy what the folks along the Platte take for granted: thousands of Sandhill cranes making those prehistoric sounds along with ducks and geese that look like clouds filling the morning and evening skies. For some of us who were born in 1948 instead of 1848, history is still here in the valley. We are not trying to walk or ride a horse up the Western Trail, but you can observe historical markers, see artifacts and visit with individuals who will talk your leg off about long-ago events. Historical museums in Grand Island, Hastings, Minden, Shelton, Kearney, The Arch and, of course, Fort Kearny State Historical Park are willing to share our rich history or the many trails that some 300,000 immigrants used in the 1850s and 1860s to go West.

 

Image Credit: Cranes have been represented in art throughout history. “Sōshū umezawa zai” (Umezawa manor in Sōshū), Hokusai Katsushika, artist, woodcut, 1832 or 1833, LC-DIG-jpd-00414 (digital file from original print). (Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress)

 

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