Alfredisms

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Norris AlfredThe Polk Progress was a Nebraska treasure that ceased publication in late 1989 after 82 years as a weekly newspaper. From 1955 until its last issue, the editor and publisher was the late Norris Alfred. In its last few months, the Progress had 900 subscribers in 45 states. Alfred was a remarkable Nebraskan with an uncanny eye for connecting the present with the future. Prairie Fire has collaborated with the Alfred family, the University of Nebraska School of Journalism and the Nebraska State Historical Society to locate and archive many of Norris's writings. We are capitalizing on our good fortune to present many of the Norris Alfred writings to our readership. We believe that his observations are as fresh and relevant to today's world as they were when originally written.

"Polking Around"
March 15, 1984

Norris Alfred, as many of our readers know, was an artist as well as a writer (and a few other things besides). The proof press piece featured below is from the Polk Progress and was provided by Dick Herman, former editor at the Lincoln Journal, to Bill Lock. Herman is a great admirer of Alfred’s work and was a good friend of Alfred’s. Alfred gave Herman this piece of his work sometime before his death. Lock suggested to Herman that it be donated to the Prairie Plains Resource Institute fundraising auction, since Alfred was an enthusiastic supporter of their work and would have been glad to contribute this piece if he were still with us. The lucky winning bidder donated $200 to the institute for the piece, which has since been framed and donated to the institute to mount on their office wall in Aurora, Neb.

Norris Alfred Proof Press Piece

 

Immigration in Nebraska